Category Archives: Clear thinking

X Media Lab – Global Media Ideas @ Vivid (Opera House)


Why should you attend this event?

The ‘Global Media Ideas‘ event is an annual international summit at the Sydney Opera House that ‘caps off’ Vivid Sydney – a festival of light, music and ideas.

I don’t claim to know what the ‘X’ in X Media Lab stands for, however if I had to guess then I would say it stands for a ‘high quality experience’. Personally, I think the ‘X’ is all about ‘crossing’ everything possible – crossing skills, crossing the T’s, crossing your comfort zones, crossing people and mediums, crossing your learnings potential, crossing ideas and global locations, crossing time and challenges etc. Some people describe it as an ‘X’ factor!

The Lab is what this is all about. At all times the focus is on you and your ideas. You may be challenged and steered into new ways of thinking – but the sole aim is to actively help you define and achieve your goals to accelerate your commercial success. You can nominate your project for the lab here: http://www.xmedialab.com/project-application
There is a good chance that I will put myself out of business by saying this, however if you are unable to afford the services of a strategy type person (like myself) to help you with your business, then you must participate.

..Being part of X|Media|Lab is like winning the startup lottery. Having one to one sessions with some of the biggest minds in the industry gave us invaluable strategic insights that have helped shape our business thinking both now and in the future. Since X|Media|Lab our online creative community, The Loop has grown beyond our wildest expectations..
– Pip Jamieson (@theloopoz), Director at The Loop, Sydney

..The XMedia crew always source an incredible array of speakers from all around the world – diverse, inspiring and, even better, surprising.  The format of the event – very short speeches – culls any dross, so the speakers are always ‘too the point’ and impactful.  Its a great way to meet and source talented folks you want to work with in the future (from a range of disciplines) and we’ve certainly made use of the opportunity on several occasions“.
– Marshall Heald (@marshallheald), Head of Online & Content Distribution at SBS, Sydney

The emphasis of this upcoming event is on practical world-class solutions: what works, what doesn’t, and what you should be planning for this year and beyond. It is not a one-way flow of information – the program is designed to enable you to connect personally with thought leaders, mentors and potential business partners, handpicked from around the world – including Silicon Valley, Shanghai, London, Hollywood, New York, Tokyo, Seoul, and Singapore.

It is an intense information download and relationship building event for communicators in the digital age. There is no filler, no pitching and no panel – just solid, actionable content that you can take away and apply to your business or organisation immediately.

If you go, you will learn how to take your business to international markets. You will learn how to apply learning from cutting-edge case studies of what’s happening now in creative ideas and innovation in media and technologies – including: mobile, social, gamication, location based services, branding and immersive environments, augmented and virtual realities.

If your role is any of the following, you should place it on your to do list muy rapido: Games Designers and Developers, Mobile Services, Web and Social Media Professionals, Creatives, Brand Specialists, Marketers, Technology Wizards, Investors, Media Analysts and Strategists.

View an Executive Summary video of last year’s ‘Global Media Ideas’ event here: http://vimeo.com/14931406

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Have you lost that black feeling?


How do you feel about black?

Please forgive me for the lack of posts on my blog – looks like the last one was august 2010. Reason being I have been booked solid since mid last year with helping half a dozen agencies with most of their accounts. It’s been so much fun!

Finally, today is when two rare and famous things happen at the same time: 1) I don’t need to be anywhere for the entire day, and; 2) I am well rested and not a comatose wreck from said activities (insert pathetic request for sympathy).

Therefore, the first thing I had wanted to do on this very cool day was to apologise for not posting anything on this blog for ages- and so began the search on Google Images using the term ‘busy’.

First picture I found was of a pair sneakers (‘Nike Busy P Air Force’) – inscribed on the side “ISN’T ALL THIS BLACK BORING?”.

It made me stop and think about a tonne of things, including how much black is in my day to day (think: car, shoes, socks, jeans, shirts, eye and hair colour, my macbook, wallet, phone, thoughts, etc) and this got be curious. I want to know what it means for you.

What does the colour black mean for you?

Who owns the colour black?

How do you feel about the colour black?

Describe what happens when you see the colour black on someone (or as the colour of a car)?

I would love to read a story about you and the colour black.

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‘Worlds Best Countries’ Verses ‘Vision Of Humanity’


These are two sets of interactive info-graphic maps that measure each country against each other using loads of indexes.

It is interesting how almost all of the indexes are mutually exclusive. It’s funny to imagine what would need to be different in our world for the the content to be reversed (a world where Newsweek media posts ‘Vision of Humanity’ and an Independent NGO posts something similar to the World’s Best Countries’).

1. The World’s Best Countries (According to Newsweek)

Newsweek recently unveiled a fascinating interactive info-graphic that enables users to click through a thorough study that ranks nations by health, education, economy, and politics across the globe. Finland came in first place, and Switzerland and Sweden trailed closely behind.

www.newsweek.com/the-worlds-best-countries

2. Vision Of Humanity

This interactive website focuses on the major issues facing us in the 21st century and tries to bring a balanced approach with factual information that is positive and solution based. They hope to help you make better choices to create the kind of future in which you wish to live.

This year 149 nations of the world have been ranked by their peacefulness and the results have stimulated some very interesting analysis.
www.visionofhumanity.org

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Facebook Privacy and Bucks for Bytes – The Under 13’s Guide


Nephews, nieces and cousins under 13 years of age who want to be your facebook friend!

ATT: Everyone

The above image is courtesy of Matt McKeon. If you visit the blog you can see Matt’s cool visual interactive interpretation of the evolution of privacy on facebook (2005 to 2010).

THE PROBLEMPrivate or public information?

This is a hot topic at the moment. It reaches a vast array of common social and business issues. And it also carries a heavy undercurrent of personal and universal themes.

The content on my facebook page is populated by hundreds of facebook friends which means I cannot monitor everything that is posted (unless I sit there and monitor it 24/7).

What do you do when a 13-year-old nephew sends a facebook friend request? It can be anyone you classify as under-age in your selective world (a relative under 13, a colleague’s child) whom sends you a facebook friend request.

There are good reasons be exclusive and say no – or ignore the friend request. And there are as many reasons to be inclusive and say yes – accept the friend request. The problem is both options do not offer a satisfying solution.

Have a think about it for a second. Imagine saying no and then imagine how you would deal with it down the line. Then imagine saying yes and dealing with it down the line.

At the crux of this issue are several things for example: internet censorship and taking responsibility for the content, taking responsibility for the audience and taking responsibility for the messages in your personal digital space.

Digital Content. Audience. Messages.

THE SOLUTIONChange the settings

I confronted this problem a few years ago and decided to say yes to the friend request from my 13 year old nephew. And then very quickly interrogated my facebook privacy settings and figured out how to select who can and can’t access areas of my facebook profile.

Once the new settings were activated I tested it out.

First, I advised my nephew’s mother that I had accepted her son’s friend request and granted very limited access to the content on my facebook page. She was relieved and thanked me profusely.

From there it has been much easier to understand where my digital borders start and end. It has also been possible to move them as and when needed. From this point I decided to play and tweak every facebook privacy  – on, off, up, down. I followed this up with testing the result with different friends and associates.

THE LEARNINGControl your space

Before this happened I had an ignorant viewpoint on internet censorship, and now I firmly believe parents are responsible for what their kids do on computers in their own home. And uncles and aunts (or adult relatives) also share this responsibility to a degree.

This article is not about internet censorship, or family values, nor is it an instruction booklet on how you should raise your kids. And I am not going to engage in any conversation about these things online.

This article is about giving consideration toward facebook as a the common denominator amongst the majority of people online. And acknowledging facebook has opened its ‘walled garden’ and made almost everything that was once private, public. Whether this is good or bad is not the issue. What you can do about it is the point.

Take control of your digital space.

Analogically imagine your photo album and personal items available on your front lawn for everyone to see. Conceptually, fifteen minutes of fame will soon be ‘fifteen minutes of privacy’.

You don’t have to take notice of this if you don’t want, however most people will need to learn how to manage their own personal digital space. You will need to start thinking about how to manage your unprotected data, how to lock and unlock things online. And you will need to figure out where are your digital borders and how much does it cost to manage your bytes.

THE BUSINESS – “Bucks for bytes” – IDC Analyze the Future

Courtesy of IDC (via Sean Kelly) you can take a look into the future of the digital universe.

“..In 2009 the world spent nearly $4 trillion on stuff to manage our digital universe. As this spending grows from now to 2020, the cost of managing each byte will drop steadily too, which is an incentive to create more information…”.

Here are a couple of graphs to help visualise all this stuff – Figure 8 and 9.

According to IDC, some tools we will see more of include:

  • Migration to cloud services
  • End user self service
  • Sophisticated data centres
  • Bottle necks in real time processing
  • Manage-more-with-less stress

Manage this stress better than competitors and you will have the advantage.

Written by Mitesh Solanki

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Filed under Big picture, Clear thinking, Culture, Innovation, Observation, Point Of View, Privacy, Social Media, Uncategorized

It’ll make you stand straight. It’s gonna make your hand shake.


“Art doesn’t actually overthrow anything except itself.” – Michael Kimmelman

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POINT OF VIEW

Fortunately this article D.I.Y Culture, by Michael Kimmelman, New York Times, caught my attention this morning amongst hundreds of impressions that I had already been exposed to before 7am. The cool image is courtesy of Béatrice de Géa for The New York Times.

I was lucky this article caught my attention when it did otherwise it would have disappeared into a bunch of haphazard morning activities (ordering coffee, texting, recalling ethereal thoughts as I woke up, checking email, reading news, checking voicemail, rescheduling meetings, organising a date for the weekend, deciding what to get my niece for her 2nd birthday, following up on a conversation about a deal I need to close this week) before actually looking at my official ‘to do list’ for the day.

Kimmelman is on point with his story and I like it (a lot). His story demonstrates clear insight and understanding into what culture truly is and highlights the “…forces of globalism that were expected to erode local cultures are helping to preserve them.”

FAVOURITE QUOTES (from the article)

“A generation or more ago, aside from what people did in their home or from what’s roughly called folk or outsider art, culture was generally thought of as something handed down from on high, which the public received.”

“..to restore civilization in West Germany by supporting a kind of ecosystem of small publishers and small bookstores to which, in certain small towns, trucks that delivered books to the bookstores overnight also delivered drugs to the drugstores: drugs for the body, books for the mind, a metaphor of recovery.”

“The myth of an avant-garde serves the same market forces avant-gardism pretends to overthrow..”, and “Art doesn’t actually overthrow anything except itself..”

“..culture identifies crucial ruptures, rifts, gaps and shifts in society”, and “..it helps reveal who we are to ourselves, often in ways we didn’t  realize in places we didn’t necessarily think to look.”

“..Gazans, like that Swedish Ikea designer, made their own culture from the bricolage of global choices.”

“Hollywood and Broadway, the major museums and art fairs and biennials and galleries, buildings designed by celebrity architects and the music business are all the traditional focus of big media, and they tell us a lot about ourselves. They constitute our cultural firmament [sky]..” and indicates that “Most culture is dark matter.” not the stars (as ‘big media’ would suggest).

The image is courtesy of Béatrice de Géa for The New York Times.

THE TEST

When I read this article I thought it would be fun to see how long it would take to publish something from the moment I experienced it (while simultaneously waking up and preparing for a day of work). Basically, I read it on my iPhone (via Twitter feed) at around 6:30am and then published with a point of view by 9am (via Posterous).

THE HAND SHAKE

The “hand shake” mention in the heading relates to the wide variety of hand shakes that occur and how they differ from place to place. The hand shake is often the first formal exchange when two people meet (for the first time or each time) and it is interesting how formal exchanges like the hand shake are now shared with a ‘tweet and greet’.

Posted via email from MITESH SOLANKI

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Snow Crash Launch at Power House


Snow Crash by HARRIET BIRKS (Video Animation)

‘Snow Crash’ is a virtual landscape that draws on the aesthetics of early flight simulators and low-fi computer graphics. It embraces a finite world of reduced planes akin to sci-fi concepts of the ‘metaverse’ in Neal Stephenson’s ‘Snow Crash’ or the ‘Autoverse’ in Greg Egan’s ‘Permutation City’.

WEB_snowcrash

The world we live in is becoming more networked through technology with the likes of Google Earth, online games and social networks (to name a few). However this world [created by Harriet Birks] exists in a beautiful emptiness that is outside the mainstream networks. This space can also be described as the relics of civilisation situated it in the distant future.

Not a tricky concept to wrap your head around, however if you can get your head around the last sentence then you should be experiencing a paradox. And if you are lucky to have a sense of humour then you may also be swimming in a parody. If you get both then you should call your mum and tell her you’re going on a date with me.

Snow Crash by HARRIET BIRKS (Video Animation)

WHAT: Launch Event, Saturday 10 October, 3 – 5 pm
WHEN: 10 October – 6 November, 2009
WHERE: beta_space, Cyberworlds Gallery, Level 1, Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Ultimo
MORE: http://betaspace.net.au
CURATOR: Julia Burns
RSVP: cultureclub@miteshsolanki.com.au

The audio track crackles with static interference suggesting possible radio transmissions from unseen origins. Pulsing black spheres and clusters of quartz crystals float eerily in the sky.

In a simultaneous glance back at the past and its post-apocalyptic narratives of the future, it provokes questions about our current direction and our changing technological landscape.

Harriet Birks is an Audio Visual artist and a lecturer of animation at COFA, UNSW.

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Back from Vacation? Don’t Waste a Precious Clear Mind


clear thinking

If you are back from vacation, in between jobs, or hammering away at the responsibility of four roles at once, then you probably need validation to turn off your mobile, email and social media tools from time-to-time.

“Seeing the big picture, the connections between information, is also more likely to activate the right hemisphere, which appears important for insight.

This research points to the idea of valuing a fresh mind more than we tend to, as this is the time we are more likely to be able to solve tough problems. Instead of valuing a quiet mind, we tend to automatically fill it up with emails or every day challenges, and waste a precious commodity.”

If you have no time to read this article then here is a ten second summary: 1) A rested mind isn’t stuck in the wrong answers. 2) A quiet mind notices subtle signals. 3) A happy mind is an open mind.

Source-train: My Facebook Home/Find Your Yang/99Percent/”Your Brain at Work” by David Rock.

[Click here to continue]

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