The lowdown on apps [infographic]


Online MBA created an interesting infographic that explores how these millions of tiny programs filter our world, and why there are so many of them being developed.

Of interest to me:

APPLE DENIED: 37,466 apps are no longer available for download by Apple.

PUBLISHERS: 42,403 publishers of apps (averaging 4 apps per publisher).

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Facebook Privacy and Bucks for Bytes – The Under 13’s Guide


Nephews, nieces and cousins under 13 years of age who want to be your facebook friend!

ATT: Everyone

The above image is courtesy of Matt McKeon. If you visit the blog you can see Matt’s cool visual interactive interpretation of the evolution of privacy on facebook (2005 to 2010).

THE PROBLEMPrivate or public information?

This is a hot topic at the moment. It reaches a vast array of common social and business issues. And it also carries a heavy undercurrent of personal and universal themes.

The content on my facebook page is populated by hundreds of facebook friends which means I cannot monitor everything that is posted (unless I sit there and monitor it 24/7).

What do you do when a 13-year-old nephew sends a facebook friend request? It can be anyone you classify as under-age in your selective world (a relative under 13, a colleague’s child) whom sends you a facebook friend request.

There are good reasons be exclusive and say no – or ignore the friend request. And there are as many reasons to be inclusive and say yes – accept the friend request. The problem is both options do not offer a satisfying solution.

Have a think about it for a second. Imagine saying no and then imagine how you would deal with it down the line. Then imagine saying yes and dealing with it down the line.

At the crux of this issue are several things for example: internet censorship and taking responsibility for the content, taking responsibility for the audience and taking responsibility for the messages in your personal digital space.

Digital Content. Audience. Messages.

THE SOLUTIONChange the settings

I confronted this problem a few years ago and decided to say yes to the friend request from my 13 year old nephew. And then very quickly interrogated my facebook privacy settings and figured out how to select who can and can’t access areas of my facebook profile.

Once the new settings were activated I tested it out.

First, I advised my nephew’s mother that I had accepted her son’s friend request and granted very limited access to the content on my facebook page. She was relieved and thanked me profusely.

From there it has been much easier to understand where my digital borders start and end. It has also been possible to move them as and when needed. From this point I decided to play and tweak every facebook privacy  – on, off, up, down. I followed this up with testing the result with different friends and associates.

THE LEARNINGControl your space

Before this happened I had an ignorant viewpoint on internet censorship, and now I firmly believe parents are responsible for what their kids do on computers in their own home. And uncles and aunts (or adult relatives) also share this responsibility to a degree.

This article is not about internet censorship, or family values, nor is it an instruction booklet on how you should raise your kids. And I am not going to engage in any conversation about these things online.

This article is about giving consideration toward facebook as a the common denominator amongst the majority of people online. And acknowledging facebook has opened its ‘walled garden’ and made almost everything that was once private, public. Whether this is good or bad is not the issue. What you can do about it is the point.

Take control of your digital space.

Analogically imagine your photo album and personal items available on your front lawn for everyone to see. Conceptually, fifteen minutes of fame will soon be ‘fifteen minutes of privacy’.

You don’t have to take notice of this if you don’t want, however most people will need to learn how to manage their own personal digital space. You will need to start thinking about how to manage your unprotected data, how to lock and unlock things online. And you will need to figure out where are your digital borders and how much does it cost to manage your bytes.

THE BUSINESS – “Bucks for bytes” – IDC Analyze the Future

Courtesy of IDC (via Sean Kelly) you can take a look into the future of the digital universe.

“..In 2009 the world spent nearly $4 trillion on stuff to manage our digital universe. As this spending grows from now to 2020, the cost of managing each byte will drop steadily too, which is an incentive to create more information…”.

Here are a couple of graphs to help visualise all this stuff – Figure 8 and 9.

According to IDC, some tools we will see more of include:

  • Migration to cloud services
  • End user self service
  • Sophisticated data centres
  • Bottle necks in real time processing
  • Manage-more-with-less stress

Manage this stress better than competitors and you will have the advantage.

Written by Mitesh Solanki

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Filed under Big picture, Clear thinking, Culture, Innovation, Observation, Point Of View, Privacy, Social Media, Uncategorized

Testing Social Media Platform_v5.6_20100


Testing Social Media Platform_v5.6_20100506_Subsection_Alpha_Beta_Quatro_Roger_Over

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A Gem Show


Not surprising if you consider the caliber of people behind it

It is always satisfying to see talented people who walk the talk without making a fuss.

The first ever Joe Black and Gibson show (Melbourne, March 2010) was refreshingly down to earth for an event that was also setting a new benchmark for men’s fashion in Australia (in my opinion).  It also struck a homely chord for me as dad and his dad’s were both tailors (and gemmologists). Moreover it was cool to return to Melbourne after living there for three years (circa 2006 to 2009).

On the back of a dozen new retail outlets in Australia, menswear label Joe Black and Gibson kicked off their first Australian show on their very own runway – which is now a firm fixture on the top floor of their HQ on Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, Melbourne. Yup, the runway is built into the company’s headquarters. Neat.

The show was snapped up and hosted exclusively by Men’s Style – Issue April 2010, which meant the seats were filled with more media than retail buyers. Most garments were one-off and hand-made specifically for the show (not available on rack) and apparently were so g’damn hot that they were lifted (stolen) within 24 hours of hitting the runway. Fortunately the garments were caught on film.

Established in 1867, in business for 130 years, Cambridge Clothing is the oldest menswear maker in New Zealand. Lead by bunch of top quality people who aim to be the leading provider of men’s formal and semiformal wardrobes in Australasia by 2011. It’s safe to say Joe Black and Gibson are in the right hands.

Take a look at Joe Black’s Espoke tailored suits. ‘The price is revolutionary.’ – Men’s Style Australia Autumn – Winter 2008.

The hospitality I received from the Joe Black crew was bar none. Thank you. Was a great show and I look forward to the next one soon.

The after party was at Comme.

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HTML5 Readiness


ATT: Digital Planners, Web Producers and Good Developers

Here is an interesting tool that will help you plan a digital campaign around the launch of a particular technology. And if you know your browser splits (by region) then you can probably figure out how many are likely to engage and interact with your digital campaign (when it goes to market).

Click here to play with the interactive version http://html5readiness.com

This tool come courtesy of the asylum – run by Paul Irish and Divya Manian

MY SOURCE TRAIN (because I love giving credit and distribution is important): Delivered to my inbox today, 1pm, 21st April 2010, by Manfred Linzner via Posterous Subscriber Feed // Published By Chris Bowler, 19th April 201 // Design and implementation notes published by Divya Manian, 17th April 2010.

Posted via web from MITESH SOLANKI

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It’ll make you stand straight. It’s gonna make your hand shake.


“Art doesn’t actually overthrow anything except itself.” – Michael Kimmelman

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POINT OF VIEW

Fortunately this article D.I.Y Culture, by Michael Kimmelman, New York Times, caught my attention this morning amongst hundreds of impressions that I had already been exposed to before 7am. The cool image is courtesy of Béatrice de Géa for The New York Times.

I was lucky this article caught my attention when it did otherwise it would have disappeared into a bunch of haphazard morning activities (ordering coffee, texting, recalling ethereal thoughts as I woke up, checking email, reading news, checking voicemail, rescheduling meetings, organising a date for the weekend, deciding what to get my niece for her 2nd birthday, following up on a conversation about a deal I need to close this week) before actually looking at my official ‘to do list’ for the day.

Kimmelman is on point with his story and I like it (a lot). His story demonstrates clear insight and understanding into what culture truly is and highlights the “…forces of globalism that were expected to erode local cultures are helping to preserve them.”

FAVOURITE QUOTES (from the article)

“A generation or more ago, aside from what people did in their home or from what’s roughly called folk or outsider art, culture was generally thought of as something handed down from on high, which the public received.”

“..to restore civilization in West Germany by supporting a kind of ecosystem of small publishers and small bookstores to which, in certain small towns, trucks that delivered books to the bookstores overnight also delivered drugs to the drugstores: drugs for the body, books for the mind, a metaphor of recovery.”

“The myth of an avant-garde serves the same market forces avant-gardism pretends to overthrow..”, and “Art doesn’t actually overthrow anything except itself..”

“..culture identifies crucial ruptures, rifts, gaps and shifts in society”, and “..it helps reveal who we are to ourselves, often in ways we didn’t  realize in places we didn’t necessarily think to look.”

“..Gazans, like that Swedish Ikea designer, made their own culture from the bricolage of global choices.”

“Hollywood and Broadway, the major museums and art fairs and biennials and galleries, buildings designed by celebrity architects and the music business are all the traditional focus of big media, and they tell us a lot about ourselves. They constitute our cultural firmament [sky]..” and indicates that “Most culture is dark matter.” not the stars (as ‘big media’ would suggest).

The image is courtesy of Béatrice de Géa for The New York Times.

THE TEST

When I read this article I thought it would be fun to see how long it would take to publish something from the moment I experienced it (while simultaneously waking up and preparing for a day of work). Basically, I read it on my iPhone (via Twitter feed) at around 6:30am and then published with a point of view by 9am (via Posterous).

THE HAND SHAKE

The “hand shake” mention in the heading relates to the wide variety of hand shakes that occur and how they differ from place to place. The hand shake is often the first formal exchange when two people meet (for the first time or each time) and it is interesting how formal exchanges like the hand shake are now shared with a ‘tweet and greet’.

Posted via email from MITESH SOLANKI

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MadMan Old School 3D Goggles [Desktop GWP]


Playing around with a magazine and an iPhone application

Three complementary copies of Desktop magazine arrived on my desk this morning and I thought the pair of old school cardboard 3D glasses (courtesy of MadMan Entertainment) was an interesting GWP (Gift With Purchase) idea. So instead of spilling coffee all over them I decided to fool around and take a photo for the first time using the Tiltshift iPhone application.

The above photo was the 3rd shot that I took [using the appl] and I thought adjustments made with the control tools (in the image on the right) were fairly easy to play with. However this may be a little adventurous for some people. Basically, the tiltshift application allowed me to focus on the MadMan logo and also blur everything else out in an interesting way.

Overall it was semi-fun. So knock your self out with it.

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